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Turning the Big C into a ‘small c’

The ‘small c’ starts with some good news about cancer: the fact that most people survive the disease, when it is detected and treated at an early stage. For these survivors, stopping cancer when it was still small, before it had time to spread to other parts of the body, turned the ‘Big C’ into a ‘small c’ – a serious but not fatal disease.  The objective of the ‘small c’ campaign is to make this the experience of a growing proportion of people diagnosed with cancer.

The campaign is raising awareness of the warning signs of cancer and the importance of telling the doctor about any of these symptoms without delay.  It is also promoting the key role of cancer screening in spotting cancer early, in some cases, even in time to prevent cancer from starting in the first place.
The ‘small c’ campaign is giving people the facts they need to improve their chances of being diagnosed with early stage cancer.  It is using research from around the world to understand why people delay telling their doctor about symptoms in time, and don’t take advantage of cancer-screening tests.  
The campaign is working alongside initiatives to address the other main causes of delayed diagnosis and treatment: GP delays in referring patients for diagnostic tests to rule out cancer, and delays in accessing diagnostic tests and in starting treatment. 

The campaign is raising awareness of the warning signs of cancer and the importance of telling the doctor about any of these symptoms without delay.  It is also promoting the key role of cancer screening in spotting cancer early - in some cases, even in time to prevent cancer from starting in the first place.

The ‘small c’ campaign is giving anyone who might have cancer the facts to improve their chances of being diagnosed at an early stage, when most people survive the disease.  For these survivors, stopping cancer when it was still small, before it had time to spread, turned the ‘Big C’ into a ‘small c’ – a serious but not fatal disease.  

The campaign is working alongside initiatives to address the other main causes of delayed diagnosis and treatment: GP delays in referring patients for diagnostic tests to rule out cancer, and delays in accessing diagnostic tests and in starting treatment.